CURRICULUM VITAE

Walter H. Piper
Schmid College of Science and Technology
Chapman University
One University Drive
Orange, CA 92866
office phone: (714) 997-6907
e-mail: wpiper@chapman.edu
Chapman website: http://www1.chapman.edu/~wpiper/
Project website: https://loonproject.org/

EDUCATION

1987: Ph.D. in Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dissertation: “Causes and consequences of social dominance in wintering white-throated sparrows.” Advisors: R. Haven Wiley & Helmut C. Mueller.

1982: B.A. Harvard University, cum laude in Biology. Thesis: “The flycatching behavior of the acorn woodpecker.”

RESEARCH/TEACHING POSITIONS

2010- : Professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, CA.

2004- : Associate Professor (tenured), Department of Biological Sciences, Chapman University.

1999-2004: Assistant Professor (tenure-track), Department of Biological Sciences, Chapman University.

1999-2002: Affiliate Professor, Biology Department, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA.
Graduate advisees: K-lynn Smith (M.S., 1999), Tanya Amrhein (M.S., 2003).

1996-1999: Visiting Assistant Professor (full-time; non tenure-track), Biology Dept, George Mason University.

1995-1996: Adjunct Professor, Biology Department, George Mason University.

1993-1996: Research Associate, Department of Zoological Research, National Zoological Park, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.

1991-1993: Postdoctoral Fellow in labs of M. West and E. Ketterson, NSF Research Training Grant, Indiana University.

1989-1991: Postdoctoral Fellow in lab of K. Rabenold, Dept. Biological Sciences, Purdue University.

OTHER RESEARCH AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2007: Appointed to National Science Foundation Grant Review Panel.

1990-present: reviewer for Ecology and Evolution, Ecology, Ecology Letters, Ecosphere, Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, Animal Behaviour, Behavioral Ecology, Journal of Wildlife Management, Biology Letters, Journal of Ornithology, Proceedings of the Royal Society – Biological Sciences, Journal of Animal Ecology, Condor, Ibis, Auk, Behaviour, Naturwissenschaften, Ornis Scandinavica, Oecologia, Oikos, Functional Ecology, Journal of Avian Biology, Journal of Wildlife Diseases, Wildlife Society Bulletin, Wilson Bulletin, Journal of Field Ornithology, Journal of Raptor Research, Biological Reviews, Marine Biology, Waterbirds, Journal of Biological and Food Science Research, Journal of Zoology, Science Advances, Ornis Norvegica, Biological Conservation.

OTHER RESEARCH AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE (cont’d)

1991-present: reviewer of grant proposals for National Science Foundation, National Geographic Society.

1991-1992: Research Awards Committee of American Ornithologists’ Union.

TEACHING EXPERIENCE

1999- : Undergraduate lectures and laboratories in Human Anatomy, General Biology, Ecology, Field Biology, Animal Behavior and Vertebrate Natural History at Chapman University.

1995-1999: Undergraduate lectures and laboratories in Animal Behavior, Ornithology and General Zoology at George Mason University.

1995-1996: Graduate course in behavioral ecology at George Mason University.

1987-1988: Science educator for grades 9-12 at American Renaissance School, White Plains, New York.

1983-1986: Teaching assistant in animal behavior lecture/laboratory (3 years), Univ. North Carolina.

1985-1986: Teaching assistant in comparative anatomy laboratory (1 year), Univ. North Carolina.

HONORS, AWARDS

2011: Wang-Fradkin Senior Professorship. Chapman University. (Chapman’s Highest Award for Scholarship).

2007: Valerie Scudder Award for excellence in teaching, scholarship, advising and service.

2006: Award for Excellence in Service. Chapman University.

2003: Valerie Scudder Award for excellence in teaching, scholarship, advising and service.

2001: Award for Excellence in Teaching. Chapman University.

MEMBERSHIPS IN PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES

American Ornithologists’ Union
Animal Behavior Society
Association of Field Ornithologists
Cooper Ornithological Society
International Society for Behavioral Ecology
Wilson Ornithological Society

GRANTS AWARDED

2020-2021: Faculty Opportunity Fund Award from Chapman University. Testing Hypotheses to Explain Population
Decline in the Common Loon. P.I. W. Piper; Co-P.I.s: B. Hoover and B. Gormally. $14,950.

2012-2017: National Science Foundation — LTREB Renewal: Long-term Investigation of Territorial Behavior and Population Dynamics in the Common Loon. P.I.: W. Piper; Co-P.I.: Charles Walcott (Cornell University). $449,688.

GRANTS AWARDED (cont’d)
2007-2012: National Science Foundation — Long-term Investigation of Territorial Behavior and Population Dynamics in the Common Loon. P.I.: W. Piper; Co-P.I.: Charles Walcott (Cornell University). $444,356.

2003-2006: National Science Foundation – Experimental Analysis of Territoriality in the Common Loon. P.I.: W. Piper; Co-P.I.: Charles Walcott (Cornell University). $180,000.
2004-2005: USEPA — Supplemental Grant II: Juvenile Survivorship and Recruitment. $19,313.
2003-2004: USEPA — Supplemental Grant I: Juvenile Survivorship and Recruitment. $37,997.

2002-2005: Co-P.I. on USEPA Grant. — Evaluating the Impact of Multiple Stressors on Common Loon Population Demographics – An Integrated Laboratory and Field Approach. –. P.I. – Dr. Michael Meyer, Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources. $495,000.
2002-2003: Chapman University Grant for Scholarship/Creativity. –Testing for Individual Recognition in Common Loons.” $2,000
2001-2002: Chapman University Grant for Scholarship/Creativity. — Testing of a Hypothesis Related to Territoriality in the Common Loon. $2,000
2000-2001: Chapman University Grant for Scholarship/Creativity. — Use of Satellite Transmitters to Track Movements in the Common Loon. — $2,000
1999-2000: Disney Conservation Fund – Tracking of Lake Usage and Intrusion Patterns in Nonbreeding Common Loons: A Pilot Project. $10,000.
1999-2000: North American Loon Fund – ” Natal Dispersal, Territory Establishment, and Use of Space by Young Common Loons “.$2,889
1997-1998: National Geographic Society – “A controlled experiment using nesting platforms in the common loon”.$13,000
1995-1996: Project LoonWatch (Sigurd Olson Environmental Institute) – “The impact of nesting platforms on reproductive success and intrusion rate in the common loon”.$1,000
1993-1994: North American Loon Fund – “The abundance and significance of floaters in the common loon population of northern Wisconsin”. approx. $2,000
1991-1992: National Science Foundation – “The behavioral basis of shared paternity in the communal stripe-backed wren”.$19,759. P.I.: W. Piper.
1986-1987: Frank M. Chapman Memorial Fund Research Grant, American Museum of Natural History – “Causes and consequences of social dominance in wintering white-throated sparrows”.approx. $500
1984-1985: Sigma Xi Research Grant – “Establishment of dominance relationships among fledgling white-throated sparrows”.approx. $1,200

MONOGRAPHS

Evers, D., J. Paruk, J. Mager and W. Piper. In press. 2020. Common Loon (Gavia immer), version 1.0. In Birds of the World (S. M. Billerman, Editor). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY.

Piper, W. H. 1997. Social dominance in birds: early findings and new horizons. In: Current Ornithology 14 (V. Nolan, E. D. Ketterson, and C. F. Thompson, eds.):125-187.

Rabenold, P. P., K. N. Rabenold, W. H. Piper, M. D. Decker & J. Haydock. 1991. Using DNA fingerprinting to assess kinship and genetic structure in avian populations. In: The Unity of Evolutionary Biology: Proc. 4th Int. Cong. Syst. Evol. Biol. (E. C. Dudley, ed.). Dioscorides Press, Portland, Oregon.

PUBLICATIONS IN SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS

  1. Piper, W. H. and L. M. Grenzer. 2020. Reckless parenting with a purpose. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment: EcoPics. In press.
  2. Hoover, B.A., Brunk, K., Jukkala, G., Banfield, N., Rypel, A.L., and Piper, W. Early evidence of natal-habitat preference: Juvenile loons feed on natal-like lakes after fledging. Ecology and Evolution. In press.
  3. Piper, W.H., Grear, J., Hoover, B., Lomery, E., and Grenzer, L.M. 2020. Plunging floater survival causes cryptic population decline in the Common Loon. The Condor: Ornithological Applications 122: 1-10.
  4. Piper, W.H., Brunk, K.B. Jukkala, G. L., Andrews, E.A., Yund, S.R., and Gould, N.G. 2018. Aging male loons make a terminal investment in territory defense. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 72: 95-106.
  5. Piper, W.H., Tischler, K.B., and Reinke, A. 2018. Common Loons respond adaptively to a black fly that reduces nesting success. Auk 135:788-797.
  6. Spool, J., Riters, L., and Piper, W.H. 2017. Investment in territorial defence relates to recent
    reproductive success in common loons (Gavia immer). Journal of Avian Biology. 48:1281-1286.
  7. Piper, W.H., Brunk, K. M., Meyer, M. W. and Flory, J. A. 2017. The long shadow of senescence: age impacts survival and territory defense in loons. Journal of Avian Biology 48:1062-1070. doi:10.1111/jav.01393
  8. Jukkala, G. and Piper, W. H. 2015. Common loon parents defend chicks according to both value and vulnerability. Journal of Avian Biology 46: 1-8.
  9. Piper, W. H., Mager, J. N., Walcott, C., Furey, L., Banfield, N., Reinke, A., Spilker, F. and Flory, J. A. 2015. Territory settlement in common loons: no footholds but age and assessment are important. Animal Behaviour 104: 155-163.
  10. Piper, W. H., Palmer, M. W., Banfield, N., Meyer, M. W. 2013. Can settlement in natal-like habitat explain maladaptive habitat selection? Proc. Royal Soc. B. 280: 20130979.
  11. Piper, W. H. Grear, J. S. and Meyer, M. W. 2012. Juvenile survival in common loons: Effects of natal lake size and pH. J. Avian Biol. 43: 280-288.
  12. Piper, W. 2011. Making habitat selection more “familiar”: a review. Behavioral Ecol. Sociobiol. 65:1329 1351.
  13. Piper, W. H., J. N. Mager, & C. Walcott. 2011. Marking loons, making progress. American Scientist 99: 220-227.

This article was also published as a selected book chapter to accompany an animal behavior textbook in “Exploring Animal Behavior, 6th Edition”. P. W. Sherman and J. Alcock, eds. 2013. Sinauer Associates, Inc. Sunderland, Massachusetts.

  1. Mager, J. N., Walcott, C. and Piper, W. H. 2011. Male common loons signal greater aggressive motivation by lengthening territorial yodels. Wilson Journal of Ornithol. 124:73-80.
  2. Piper, W. H. 2011. Troubled Waters: Loons’ territorial fights are no laughing matter. Natural History, 119: 22-26.
  3. Mager, J. N., Walcott, C. and Piper, W. H. 2010. Common loons (Gavia immer) can differentiate between yodels of territorial neighbors and non-neighbors. J. Field Ornithol., 81: 392-401.
    PUBLICATIONS IN SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS (cont’d)
  4. Grear, J. S., Meyer, M. W., Cooley Jr., J. H., Kuhn, A., Piper, W. H., Mitro, M. G., Vogel, H. S., Taylor, K. M., Kenow, K. P., Craig, S. M., Nacci, D. E. 2009. Population growth and demography of common loons in the northern United States. Journal of Wildlife Management 73: 1108-1115.
  5. Piper, W. H., Walcott, C. Mager, J. N. & Spilker, F. 2008. Fatal battles in common loons: a preliminary analysis. Animal Behaviour 75: 1109-1115.
  6. Piper, W. H., Walcott, C. Mager, J. N. & Spilker, F. 2008. Nestsite selection by male loons leads to sex biased site familiarity. Journal of Animal Ecology 77: 205-210.
  7. Neudorf, D. L. H., Stutchbury, B. J. M. & Piper, W. H. 2008. The function of breeding season chip calls by female hooded warblers (Wilsonia citrina). Behaviour 145:231-250.
  8. Mitro, M. G., D. C. Evers, M. W. Meyer & W. H. Piper. 2008. Common loon survival rates and mercury in New England and Wisconsin. Journal of Wildlife Management 72:665-673.
  9. Mager, J. N., C. Walcott & W. H. Piper. 2008. Nest platforms increase aggressive behavior in common loons (Gavia immer). Naturwissenschaften 95: 141-147.
  10. Mager, J. N., C. Walcott and W. H. Piper. 2007. Male common loons (Gavia immer) communicate body mass and condition through dominant frequencies of territorial yodels. Animal Behaviour 73:683-690.
  11. Piper, W. H., C. Walcott, J. Mager, M. Perala, K B. Tischler, Erin Harrington, A. J. Turcotte, M. Schwabenlander and N. Banfield, 2006. Prospecting in a solitary breeder: chick production elicits territorial intrusions in common loons. Behavioral Ecology 17:881-888.
  12. Walcott, C., J. N. Mager and W. H. Piper, 2006. Changing territories, changing tunes: male loons, Gavia immer, change their vocalizations when they change territories. Animal Behaviour 71: 673-683.
  13. Morton E. S., B. J. M. Stutchbury, and W. H. Piper, 2004. Cooperative breeding in the tropical Mockingbird (Mimus gilvus) in the Panama Canal Zone. Ornitologia Neotropical 15 (3): 417-421.
  14. Piper, W. H., M. W. Meyer, M. Klich, K. B. Tischler and A. Dolsen. 2002. Floating platforms increase reproductive success of common loons. Biological Conservation 104:199-203.
  15. Piper, W. H., Tischler, K. B., Dolsen, A. 2001. Mother-son breeding pairs form in common loons. Wilson Bulletin 113: 441-444.
  16. Piper, W. H., K. B. Tischler and M. Klich. 2000. Territory acquisition in loons: the importance of take-over. Animal Behaviour 59:385-394.
  17. Piper, W. H., D. C. Evers, M. W. Meyer, K. B. Tischler and M. Klich. 2000. Do common loons mate for life?: scientific investigation of a widespread myth. Pp. 43-49 in: Loons: old history and new findings. North American Loon Fund: Meredith, New Hampshire.
  18. Morton, E. S., B. J. M. Stutchbury, J. S. Howlett & W. H. Piper. 1998. Genetic monogamy in blue-headed vireos and a comparison with a sympatric vireo with extrapair paternity. Behavioral Ecology 9:515-524.
  19. Tarof, S. A., B. J. M. Stutchbury, W. H. Piper & R. C. Fleischer. 1998. Does breeding density covary with extra-pair fertilizations in hooded warblers? Journal of Avian Biology 29:145-154.
  20. Stutchbury, B. J. M., E. S. Morton, & W. H. Piper. 1998. Extra-pair mating system of a synchronously breeding tropical songbird Journal of Avian Biology 29:72-78.

PUBLICATIONS IN SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS (cont’d)

  1. Piper, W. H., J. Paruk, D. C. Evers, M. W. Meyer, K. B. Tischler, M. Klich & J. J. Hartigan. 1997. Local movements of color-marked common loons. Journal of Wildlife Management. 61:1253-1261.
  2. Neudorf, D. L., B. J. Stutchbury & W. H. Piper. 1997. Covert extra-territorial behavior of female hooded warblers. Behavioral Ecology 8:595-600.
  3. Stutchbury, B. J. M., W. H. Piper, D. L. Neudorf, S. A. Tarof, J. M. Rhymer, G. Fuller & R. C. Fleischer. 1997. Correlates of extra-pair fertilization success in hooded warblers. Behavioral Ecology & Sociobiology 40:119-126.
  4. Piper, W. H., D. C. Evers, M. W. Meyer, K. B. Tischler, J. Kaplan & R. C. Fleischer. 1997. Genetic monogamy in the common loon Gavia immer. Behavioral Ecology & Sociobiology 41:25-31.
  5. Piper, W. H. 1995. Social dominance in young white-throated sparrows: effects of early social experience and the unstable period. Auk 112:878-889.
  6. Piper, W. H., P. Parker & K. N. Rabenold. 1995. Facultative dispersal by juvenile males in the cooperative stripe-backed wren. Behavioral Ecology 6:337-342.
  7. Piper, W. H. 1994. Courtship, copulation, nesting behavior and brood parasitism in the Venezuelan stripe-backed wren. Condor 96, 654-671.
  8. Nalepa, C. A. & W. H. Piper. 1994. Bird dispersal of the larval stage of a seed predator. Oecologia 100:200-202.
  9. Wiley, R. H., W. H. Piper, M. Archawaranon & E. Wyrick Thompson. 1993. Singing in relation to social dominance and testosterone in white-throated sparrows. Behaviour 127, 175-190.
  10. Piper, W. H. & G. Slater. 1993. Polyandry and incest avoidance in the cooperative stripe-backed wren of Venezuela. Behaviour 124, 227-247.
  11. Wiley, R. H. & W. H. Piper. 1992. Timing of cranial pneumatization in white-throated sparrows. Condor 94, 336-343.
  12. Piper, W. H. & P. Parker Rabenold. 1992. Use of fragment-sharing estimates from DNA fingerprinting to determine relatedness in a tropical wren. Molecular Ecology 1, 69-78.
  13. Rabenold, P. P., W. H. Piper, K. N. Rabenold & D. J. Minchella. 1991. Polymorphic minisatellite amplified on avian W chromosome. Genome 34, 489-493.
  14. Rabenold, P. P., K. N. Rabenold, W. H. Piper & D. J. Minchella. 1991. Density-dependent dispersal in social wrens: genetic analysis using novel matriline markers. Animal Behaviour 42, 144-146.
  15. Piper, W. H. & R. H. Wiley. 1991. Effects of laparotomies on wintering white-throated sparrows and the usefulness of wing chord as a criterion for sexing. Journal of Field Ornithology 62, 40-45.
  16. Piper, W. H. & R. H. Wiley. 1990. Correlates of range size in wintering white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis). Animal Behaviour 40, 545-552.
  17. Piper, W. H. 1990. Site-tenacity and dominance in wintering white-throated sparrows Zonotrichia albicollis (Passeriformes: Emberizidae). Ethology 85, 114-122.
  18. Piper, W. H. 1990. Exposure to predators and access to food in wintering white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis). Behaviour 112, 284-298.
    PUBLICATIONS IN SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS (cont’d)
  19. Piper, W. H. & R. H. Wiley. 1990. The relationship between social dominance, subcutaneous fat, and annual survival in wintering white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis). Behavioral Ecology & Sociobiology 26, 201-208.
  20. Rabenold, P. P., K. N. Rabenold, W. H. Piper, J. Haydock & S. W. Zack. 1990. Shared paternity revealed by genetic analysis in cooperatively breeding tropical wrens. Nature 348, 538-540.
  21. Westneat, D. F., W. H. Piper & R. H. Wiley. 1990. Lack of association between allozymic variation and social dominance in free-living white-throated sparrows. Canadian Journal of Zoology 68, 128-133.
  22. Piper, W. H. & R. H. Wiley. 1989. Distinguishing morphs of the white-throated sparrow in basic plumage. Journal of Field Ornithology 60, 73-83.
  23. Piper, W. H. & R. H. Wiley. 1989. Correlates of dominance in wintering white-throated sparrows: age, sex and location. Animal Behaviour 37, 298-310. (See also Errata: Animal Behaviour 42, 339, 1991).

PUBLICATIONS IN POPULAR PERIODICALS

Piper, W. H. 2002. Scouting for a place to breed. Interpretive Birding Bulletin (St. Cloud, MN) 3, 27-30.

Piper, W. H. 1996, Testing the legends of loons. Zoogoer (a publication of the Friends of the National Zoo, Washington, DC). May/June 1996.

Piper, W. H. 1993. Research sheds light on loon fidelity. Tremolo (a publication of the Sigurd Olson Environmental Institute, Ashland, WI).

BOOK REVIEWS

Piper, W. H. 2001. Review of Molecular Approaches to Ecology and Evolution (DeSalle and Schierwater, eds.). Quarterly Review of Biology, 76: 374.

Piper, W. H. 1998. [Review of] Current Ornithology, vol. 13, Auk 115:1084-1085.

PAPERS PRESENTED AT MEETINGS

Terminal Investment in Common Loons. (by W. H. Piper) at Winter Animal Behavior Conference, Steamboat Springs, CO. 2017.

Male loons, but not females, senesce! (By W. H. Piper) at Northeast Loon Study Working Group meeting. Moultonborough, NH. 2016.

Senescence and age-related changes in loon behavior. (by W. H. Piper) at Winter Animal Behavior Conference, Steamboat Springs, CO. 2016.

Loon parents defend chicks according to both value and vulnerability. (by W. H. Piper) at Winter Animal Behavior Conference. Steamboat Springs, CO. 2015.

Breeding habitat imprinting in common loons (by W. H. Piper) at Winter Animal Behavior Conference. Steamboat Springs, CO. 2014.

The effect of age on territory acquisition: a test of the foothold model (by W. H. Piper) at Winter Animal Behavior Conference in Steamboat Springs, Colorado 2013.

PAPERS PRESENTED AT MEETINGS (cont’d)

Young Loons Settle on Lakes of Similar Size and pH to The Natal Lake. North American Ornithological Conference. Vancouver, Canada. 2012.

Natal Lake Matching in Loons (by W. H. Piper) at Winter Animal Behavior Conference in Steamboat Springs, Colorado 2012 .

A “familiar” model for optional resettlement on territories. (by W. H. Piper) at Winter Animal Behavior Conference in Steamboat Springs, Colorado 2011.

How Loons Choose Territories. (by W. H. Piper) at Northeast Loon Study Working Group meeting in Moultonborough, New Hampshire. 2011.

Age-related changes in behavior of territorial loons. (by W. H. Piper) at Northeast Loon Study Working Group meeting in Waltham, Massachusetts. 2010.

Age and Sex Affect Territory Acquisition in the Common Loon. (by W. H. Piper) at Cooper Ornithological meeting in Tucson, Arizona, 2009.

Influence of Sex and Age on Mode of Territory Acquisition in Common Loons (by W. H. Piper) at Animal Behavior Society Meeting, Snowbird, Utah, 2008.

Male Loons Become Familiar with Breeding Territories through Control of Nestsite Placement (by W. H. Piper) at American Ornithologists’ Union meeting, Laramie, Wyoming, 2007.

Male Loons – but Not Females – Gain Fitness Boost from Optimal Nest Placement. (by W. H. Piper) at Animal Behavior Society Meeting, Snowbird, Utah, 2006.

“Fatal fighting in common loons: do males risk too much? (by W. H. Piper) at Animal Behavior Society Meeting, Snowbird, Utah, 2005.

“Territory acquisition and defense in the common loon? (by W. H. Piper) at 27th Western Field Ornithologists’ meeting, Costa Mesa, California, 2002.

“Do common loon use footholds to acquire territories? (by W. H. Piper) at Animal Behavior Society meeting, Bloomington, Indiana, 2002.

“Why do territorial loons intrude into the territories of neighbors? (by W. H. Piper) at Animal Behavior Society meeting, Corvallis, Oregon, 2001.

“Territory acquisition in the common loon: do nonbreeders reconnoiter?” (by W. H. Piper) at American Ornithologists’ Union meeting, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada, 2000.

“Status of parrots in Orange County” (by W. H. Piper) at The Status and Natural History of Naturalized Parrots (Psittacidae) in California meeting in Pasadena, California, 2000.

“Takeover and desertion of territories in the common loon” (by W. H. Piper, D. C. Evers & M. W. Meyer) at Animal Behavior Society meeting, College Park, MD, 1997.

“Good news and bad news for common loon enthusiasts: genetic monogamy but a high divorce rate (by W. H. Piper, D. C. Evers, M. W. Meyer, K. B. Tischler & M. Klich) at American Ornithologists Union meeting, Minneapolis, MN, 1997.

“Local movement patterns of marked common loons late in the breeding season” (by W. H. Piper, D. Evers, M. Meyer) at North Amer. Lake Manage. Soc. meeting, Toronto, Ontario, 1995.
PAPERS PRESENTED AT MEETINGS (cont’d)

“Towards a dynamic view of social dominance in wintering sparrows” (by W.H. Piper) at Animal Behavior Society meeting, Lincoln, NE, 1995.

“The roles of floaters in reproduction and territory maintenance in the common loon” (by W. H. Piper, D. Evers & M. Meyer) at Animal Behavior Society meeting, Seattle, WA, 1994.

“Cryptic dispersal in the cooperative stripe-backed wren revealed by DNA fingerprinting” (by W. H. Piper, P. G. Parker, K. Rabenold, J. Haydock & S. Zack) at Cooper Ornithological meeting, Sacramento, CA, 1993.

“The development of social dominance in the white-throated sparrow” (by W. H. Piper) at Cooper Ornithological meeting, Sacramento, CA, 1993.

The behavioral basis of shared paternity in the stripe-backed wren of Venezuela” (by W. H. Piper and Gary Slater) at meeting of International Society of Behavioral Ecology, Princeton, NJ, 1992.

“Site-tenacity and dominance in wintering white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis)” (by W. H. Piper) at joint meeting of American Ornithologists’ Union and Cooper Ornithological Society, Los Angeles, 1990.

“Social dominance affects subcutaneous fat levels and return rates in wintering white-throated sparrows: results based on multivariate analyses” (by W. H. Piper & R. H. Wiley) at American Ornithologists’ Union meeting, Pittsburgh, 1989.

“A study of range size in wintering white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis)” (by W. H. Piper & R. H. Wiley) at Wilson Ornithological Society meeting, Notre Dame, IN, 1989.

“Correlates of dominance in the white-throated sparrow” (by W. H. Piper) at Wilson Ornithological Society meeting, Rosemont, PA, 1988.

“Site-dependent dominance in wintering white-throated sparrows” (by W. H. Piper) at 19th International Ornithological Congress, Ottawa, Canada, 1986.

“Do dominant birds feed closer to cover than subordinates?: findings that contradict Schneider’s distance hierarchy analysis” (by W. H. Piper) at Wilson Ornithological Society meeting, Gatlinburg, TN, 1986.