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The first round of censuses in the study area each year is always bittersweet. On the one hand, it is exciting to see the crop of new young adults that have settled and to wonder how well they will defend their new territories. On the other hand, some old familiar loons are missing. This year is typical in that the disappeared veterans are mostly males. Three of 12 males of 20+ years have failed to reclaim their 2015 territory; only 1 of 12 20+ females have not resettled on their territory from the year before. Thus, male senescence lives!

Among the 2016 no-shows are the Jersey City Flowage male, who bounced back from a nasty fishing entanglement in 2014, regained his territory in 2015 and hatched a chick there. Another loss is the Soo Lake male, who was among the most aggressive in our study area. I still tremble when I recall his response when we played a few loon calls in his direction in 2000. He approached my canoe to within 2 feet, sat right next to me in the stern and glowered for the better part of two minutes. A spine-tingling experience for sure!

Yet the news is not all bad. Six young ABJs (“adults banded as juveniles”) have settled in the study area, providing us with valuable data on loons whose age is known precisely. New settlers include two females hatched in Vilas County — a 9 year-old that settled on Manson and a 6 year-old now paired with the male on Harrison Flowage. New male faces belong to an 8 year-old that took over Brandy Lake (near Woodruff) and a 7 year-old that battled and evicted the 22 year-old male from Oscar Jenny. (Thanks to Jeremy, who observed this eviction in progress.)

Perhaps the most intriguing findings from the first round of lake visits by Kristin and Linda are the serendipitous ones. Kristin relocated one of our oldest males — a bird known to be 27 years of age or older. Evicted two years ago from Muskellunge Lake, this loon licked his wounds and got himself back in the game by settling on nearby Swanson Lake, which had fallen into disuse in 2015. We had not seen this bird in two years and were almost ready to give up on him. Linda found a female with even greater resiliency. This old loon produced a dozen chicks over the years as the breeder on Buck Lake from 1998 to 2009. After her eviction from Buck in 2010, she floated, found a breeding position on Hildebrand in 2012 and produced a chick there in 2013. But she was driven off of Hildebrand last year. Her response to this second setback was typical of female loons — she bided her time and claimed that territory again when the opportunity presented itself. As I confront another season of hauling canoes from lake to lake, my back begins to ache in anticipation. I hope the examples of these two dogged old codgers gives me the strength to persevere!