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Our paper that describes basic features of senescence has been accepted for publication Journal of Avian Biology. With the lightning-fast turnarounds and early views that the public is now granted to scientific articles, you can search for the paper and read an advance copy…months before copy-editing and proofing of the final version is done. Let me know if you find any typos!Screen Shot 2017-03-10 at 12.47.06 PM

The paper describes findings that I have been blogging about for some months now. First, both sexes of loons senesce (begin to die at a high rate) once they reach their mid-20s. Second, at first blush it seems that the sexes do not differ substantially in the senescence pattern. Third, this paper looks only at territory holders, which are the creme de la creme of adult loons, because they have not only survived to adulthood, but also claimed a territory and produced chicks there. Thus, this group of birds analyzed does not include the many adults who tried but failed to settle on a territory or settled briefly but did not reproduce. Fourth, old males (but not females) suffer a decline in territory resettlement after being evicted from a territory. Finally, we present in the paper preliminary evidence that suggests male might increase or at least maintain high breeding success at advanced age, while it seems that females fall into reproductive decline. So there is a glimmer of possible terminal investment by males (increased investment by animals near death) at which this paper hints. If you have followed my blog, you know that we have data from a separate analysis that deals more directly with the possibility of terminal investment by males.

That is all I have for now. I have just finished hiring the four field staff members for this year. They are a strong bunch and include one of our seasoned hands from 2016. Since we are on the verge of ice-out already, I have gotten the crew hired none too soon. By the time most of us arrive in May, nesting will be well underway. No matter. We are accustomed to scrambling to keep up with the loons.

See you out on the lakes!